Ancient Cherokee Games: The Cornstalk Shoot

Cherokee Nation History and Culture online is proud to present part eleven in our spotlight on history and culture series: Ancient Cherokee Games: The Cornstalk Shoot

Ancient Cherokee Games: Blowgun Shooting

Cherokee Nation History and Culture online is proud to present part ten in our spotlight on history and culture series: Ancient Cherokee Games: Blowgun Shooting

Ancient Cherokee Games: Cherokee Marbles

Cherokee Nation History and Culture online is proud to present part nine in our spotlight on history and culture series: Ancient Cherokee Games: Cherokee Marbles

Ancient Cherokee Games: Stickball

Cherokee Nation History and Culture online is proud to present part eight in our spotlight on history and culture series: Ancient Cherokee Games: Stickball

Ancient Cherokee Games: Chunkey

Cherokee Nation History and Culture online is proud to present part seven in our spotlight on history and culture series: Ancient Cherokee Games: Chunkey

Cherokee Cooking

Cherokee Nation History and Culture online is proud to present part six in our spotlight on history and culture series: Cherokee Cooking

Flint Knapping

Cherokee Nation History and Culture online is proud to present part five in our spotlight on history and culture series: Flint Knapping

Cherokee Basketry

Cherokee Nation History and Culture online is proud to present part four in our spotlight on history and culture series: Cherokee Basketry

 

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Nov 05 2013

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What began as a primitive survival technique has now become a work of art. Flint knapping began centuries ago as a means of making tools for hunting and for everyday life. Today, many artists do flint knapping as a way to stay connected with their culture.


Flint knapping is the art of creating primitive arrowheads, axe heads, knives, spears and other tools, by carefully shaping rocks into cutting instruments by the use of antler tools flintknapper sepia glowand other natural materials. Arrowheads are the most commonly created item today.


Arrowheads are made from a variety of flint rock. Various colors of flint are used depending on the geographical area where the natural material is found. The process begins by first finding two larger pieces of flint and chipping away at one with the other until a flat portion breaks away. The unwanted rock of the flat portion is then removed, using various methods, until the piece begins to resemble the arrowhead shape. From there, deer antlers are used to gently flake away the edges of the piece, creating the sharp point.


Flint knapping requires the ability to control the way rocks break when they are struck. It requires patience and precision. Many flint knappers will tell you they spend a lot of time selecting the perfect rock with which to work, taking great care with what nature has provided.